Dispelling the myths of sexual physiology: a primer of sex education (101) PDF Print E-mail
Wellness - Wellness
Written by Jeff Davis   
Tuesday, 06 April 2010 01:23

logo_new2.240x240Dispelling the myths of sexual physiology: a primer of sex education (101).

Click on Read More only after reading the following disclaimer:

While the following article has no bad words, no potty-mouth, no profanity, it does address an issue that some may find uncomfortable; namely, the sexuality of humans, both men and women.  If you are someone who feels put off by a frank discussion of sex in clinically appropriate terms, you should refrain from reading further, lest you may feel distressed, or even discombobulated.  For those who wish to be enlightened, and perhaps even liberated, the truth, and nothing but the truth, awaits you.  Of course, there will be those among you who are already fully aware and in touch with your bodies, in which case I am simply singing to the choir, two octaves above high C.

Myths abound in all cultures, and no where are they more prevalent than in matters of sexual behavior.  As with all myths, trying to convince people of the truth often goes to naught, perhaps because open discussions about sex are often considered a bit naughty and not too nice.  To the contrary, however, I am of the firm belief that unrestricted knowledge of sexuality allows humans to have a more fulfilling understanding of their bodies and selves, not to mention the enhancement of a mutual relationship.

Unlike in my youth, many years ago, the current times are awash in readily available information, particularly on the ubiquitous internet.  Discussions of sexual matters can be found on thousands of websites, and even newspapers and magazines are up-front in presenting various topics:  the New York Times has published an extensive book review on the history of vibrators, the Washington Post recently had an article on an international conference about the “G spot.”  A problem arises, however, in knowing how to sift through all the information that is out there; especially given that there is such disparity in the claims that are made.

Thus:  A primer on orgasms, both female and male.  The one subject that is at the culmination of the sexual act; the peak, the pinnacle, both figuratively and literally:  that ultimate experience which nothing else in the universe can replicate.

The simple physiology of having an orgasm is precisely the same for females and males.  In each gender, there is a unique spot of specialized tissue which, when rubbed repetitively, will result in rhythmic waves of contraction and relaxation in the pelvic muscles, transmitting to the brain a veritable explosion of pleasure to the max, a seizure of intense ecstasy, with a capital E.

This doesn’t take rocket science to figure out, nor do you need teams of researchers armed with probes and monitors, as if the source of an orgasm was hidden from discovery by ordinary sexual beings.  Once you know where to look and what to do, it is obvious that there is really nothing mysterious or uncertain about the origin of such convulsive bliss.

Men and women are absolutely no different in the fact that they have strictly one, and I emphasize, only one, part of their bodies that leads to an orgasm.

 

male_anatomy_copy For men, the locus of the tissue that allows a climax, an orgasm, is on the dorsal surface of the penis.  The head of the penis is called the glans.  On the top side of the glans there is a ridge, a rounded area of tissue called the corona, where just below is the shaft of the penis.  This is it:  The Spot.  Quoting from Wapedia:  “The circumference of the base of the glans forms a rounded projecting border, the corona of the glans penis, overhanging a deep retroglandular sulcus, behind which is the neck of the penis.”  The one and only Spot.

 

 

 

 

The source of an orgasm for women is to be found at the clitoris, that similarly specialized nubbin of tissue directly below a hood of skin at the juncture of the labia minora.  In an exactly analogous fashion, this is it: this is the Spot.

female_1

 

Just one location for each of the sexes.  The one and only place for males, the one and only place for females, and no exceptions.

Granted, there are various other areas of a person’s body which are sensitive to touch and add to the sensation of pleasure…..those racy “G” spots.  Lips, tongues, breasts, nipples, lining of the vagina, cervix, shaft of penis, scrotum, perineum, anus; all of these anatomic areas can enhance the pleasurable sensations during the sexual act, but not one of them, nada, zero, will lead to an orgasm.

In other words, the only way for either of the sexes to have a climax is to have this specialized tissue stimulated by rubbing:  corona for men, clitoris for women.  The knowledge of this dates back to centuries ago, when Galen wrote of the practice of massaging the clitoris until the point of “paroxysm,” which is just another way of saying, to the point of an orgasm.  Women were reportedly in need of such therapy because of a build-up of pelvic congestion, leading to irritability, nervousness, insomnia, among other maladies.  It is not by accident that these behavioral characteristics were called hysteria, which is derived from the Greek word hysteros, which means womb.

Even in the early 1900’s, the medical profession was cognizant of this presumed source of mental distress that was diagnosed in many of their female patients.  These women were treated in the office with vibrators, and stimulation of the clitoris resulted in an orgasm, allowing a release of tensions in the body, as well as in the mind.        Sears_vibrators

Vibrators during this era were highly popular and a huge variety were advertised in the Sears & Robuck catalogue:  Dr. Macaura’s Blood Circulator.  Veedee Vibrator.  I kid you not.  Even Good Housekeeping was involved, testing the products to give reassurances of safety to consumers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it comes to a female orgasm, herein lays the problem, if you want to even call it a problem:  for a woman to have a climax, the clitoris must, and I categorically emphasize MUST, be rubbed in order to reach an orgasm.  Direct, right on top of it type of stimulation, and this is absolutely, entirely impossible during the sexual act of a man’s penis penetrating a woman’s vagina.  For a male, during sexual intercourse his corona is rubbed back and forth in the process of pelvic movement, and this will lead to an orgasm and ejaculation.  For a woman, there is simply no way for her clitoris to be stimulated while her vagina is being penetrated by a penis.  It doesn’t matter if it’s missionary-style with the man on top, doggie-style, woman on top, spooning on your side, or standing on your head, the penis cannot come in direct contact with the clitoris.  It is anatomically impossible, and as a result,  there is no point to point contact with the clitoris and no orgasm for the woman.

The bottom line is that a woman is not going to have an orgasm during intercourse as a result of penile stimulation within the vagina.  There is nothing wrong in the least with this fact of life, for there are many other ways of rubbing the clitoris, and they certainly don’t require a time machine to take you back to doctors’ offices from days of old.

Finger, tongue, dildo, vibrator:  anything that increases blood flow to that exquisite female organ and leads to an orgasm will be quite sufficient.  A female climax can, in fact, occur during the time of male penetration, but only with the caveat that there is something else rubbing directly on the clitoris at the same time.

Contrast this with some of the misinformation that is to be found on the internet, and quoted below:

“The female orgasm is a puzzle for evolutionary biologists. It is unclear why women should have orgasms at all, and it is particularly baffling that so many women should be unable to have orgasms during penetrative sex, but able to have them by masturbation.”

Excuse me, but there is nothing in the least bit baffling as to why a woman does not have an orgasm during penetrative sex but is able to achieve one by masturbation……once again, it takes direct stimulation of the clitoris.  Duh!

“For some women, the outer third of their vagina and the cervix are also very sensitive, sometimes even more sensitive than the clitoris. When the G-Spot is stimulated during intercourse or other vaginal penetration, these women do have intense orgasms. This would be what is referred to as a vaginal orgasm -- without clitoral stimulation.”

This statement is pure poppycock, 100% false, as in, “No way, Jose.”  Those areas may indeed arouse pleasurable sensations, but they are nothing compared to the Real McCoy.  Ask any woman who knows.  There has to be clitoral stimulation.

“Many women have very sensitive nipples, and can actually reach orgasm from nipple stimulation alone.”

Are you trying to spoof me?   When someone comes across with such blatantly ridiculous claims as this, no wonder so many people are confused.

“Many women never have orgasms during intercourse, and some also cannot have them through masturbation.”

Half right and half wrong:

No woman has an orgasm during intercourse (unless, as stated above, the clitoris is being stimulated from something other than the penis, given that it doesn’t have direct contact with the clitoris).  Any woman has the capacity to have an orgasm, as long as she has a clitoris and functioning nervous system with no shorts in the wiring.

Any woman can have an orgasm through masturbation.  Because the physiologic groundwork is there, it becomes a matter of mind-set and practice.

 

As with females, there are also myths in regard to male sexuality.  Consider one of the jokingly-remarked comments that you might have heard when growing up and struggling with the sexuality of adolescence.  The guys I knew were at times wont to make sophomoric declarations such as, “If you masturbate, you’ll grow hair on your palms.”   You were not likely to admit to masturbating, even if you were one of the surreptitious enthusiasts, but regardless, everyone knew that masturbation didn’t really cause hair to grow on one’s palms:  palms are visible, and you could see for yourself that your cohorts were not “werewolves of the palms.”

hairy_palm Looking at this old photo of my cousin’s hand when he was an adolescent, however, methinks I may be wrong on this one, for surely pictures don’t lie.   (But I presume you realize that I say this only in jest.)

Another readily accepted myth that is prevalent to this day is that of the “wet dream,” or nocturnal emission.  Emissions sound like bad things spewing from industrial plants, so it may be better to call it nocturnal ejaculation, implying that it happens while one is completely unaware; in fact, sawing zzzz’s to beat the band.

“When boys enter puberty, a lot of hormonal changes occur. These changes can result in spontaneous erections during sleep, during the day and wet dreams.  The emission may happen with or without an erection, and it is possible to wake up during, or to simply sleep through, the ejaculation. Though nocturnal emissions are mostly attributed to, and more noticeable by men, women also have them.

Once again, an example of people being subjected to assertions about sexuality that have no basis in fact.  While it is true that a male has periodic erections every night during sleep, no male is going to have an orgasm without rubbing on the corona of the penis. If you make the assumption that a male masturbates during sleep to the point of an orgasm, which has never been proven to be true, then I suppose he could have a wet dream.   In reality, this is just a case of inaccuracies being perpetuated, for there is not a shred of evidence to back up any of the claims about wet dreams.  It makes perfect sense why such evidence is lacking when you consider the physiology of how a male or female has an orgasm.

At this point, a conclusion to Sex-Ed 101.  Myth-shattering drawn to a close; put to bed, one might say, or, distilled down to its crystalline essence.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 April 2010 20:25
 
Comments (1)
I'm still searching for another musicgasm.
J.D.Tuckley
Tuesday, 13 April 2010 20:19
All my years of playing spontaneous, improvisational jazz drums in small combo settings, and I've only had three of them in my entire life. And the last one was 20 years ago. They last about 40-50 seconds.
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