Md. Attorney General to Hold Public Hearing on Repeal of Clean Power Plan PDF Print E-mail
Written by Engage Mountain Maryland   
Wednesday, 03 January 2018 09:29

Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh, joined by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., Speaker of the House, Michael E. Busch, and the Maryland General Assembly, announced that Maryland will hold a hearing on the Trump Administration’s proposed repeal of the Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units, commonly known as the Clean Power Plan.

The Clean Power Plan established the first-ever nationwide limits on greenhouse gas emissions from existing fossil-fuel power plants. On March 28, 2017, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a notice indicating the EPA’s intent to review the Clean Power Plan. On October 16, the EPA proposed to repeal the Clean Power Plan, claiming that it is not consistent with the Clean Air Act.

EPA describes the Clean Power Plan as a punishing regulation that means lost jobs for energy workers. Listening sessions in high energy-producing states such as California, Wyoming, and Kansas have already been held to garner support for the repeal.

EPA is now taking comments on that proposal but has scheduled no hearings on the East Coast. States across the country in addition to Maryland are holding their own public hearings and will submit comments directly to the EPA. Maryland’s hearing will address the environmental and economic impact on the State of Maryland of the proposed repeal and will ensure Marylanders’ voices are heard on this important measure.

The hearing will take place on January 11, 2018, from 1:00 PM to 4:30 PM in the Joint Hearing Room of the Legislative Services Building in Annapolis. Additional information and information for individuals who wish to submit testimony, or testify in person can be found here:

 
Allegany Arts Council to Host Start to Finish IV, An Open Studio Experience PDF Print E-mail
Written by Desiree Bullard   
Wednesday, 03 January 2018 09:25
CUMBERLAND – The Allegany Arts Council hosts Start to Finish IV, an interactive, studio-artist exhibition until January 27th. Participating artists gather in the Saville Gallery to create original artwork using a range of method and media. Artists’ work will be on display, including previously completed pieces as well as work in progress. Artists will be available while they work to speak with visitors about technique, answer questions, and provide demonstrations.
 
Throughout the month, artists will present children and family workshops. Some artists will be available for the entire month, while others are present for shorter periods, depending on individual availability. Participating artists include Donna Godlove, who is using soft pastels to create her artwork. Patricia Wilt uses pastels as well, but also incorporates watercolor and oil painting into her work. Patricia Peacock uses acrylic paint. Peacock will also talk with visitors about how she utilizes social media as an artist. Jennifer Browne, Director of FSU’s Center for the Literary Arts, is completing a writing project during the event. Bill Pfaff uses pen and ink with watercolor washes and will provide impromptu lessons on pen and ink skills. Dominique Vallon is an oil painter who uses various media and tools in her work. Beth Dewey is using mixed media to create a life-sized animal sculpture.
 
Also planned for the month are musical performances and art demonstrations. Members of the Queen City Flute Choir and the Mountain Ridge High School are expected to perform. There will be a polymer clay demonstration from JoLecia Crowe, as well as a hula hoop demo by Desiree Bullard. A series of photography classes are scheduled for Wednesdays in January beginning the 10th. Several craft workshops and demonstrations are still in the works. Visitors can view the calendar of events through the Start to Finish event page on the Arts Council’s website, www.alleganyartscouncil.org, or Facebook.
 
The month-long event will conclude with a public reception on Saturday, January 27 from 6-8pm. This event is open to the public and refreshments will be served. Please call (301) 777-2787 or email  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  for more information.
 
FSU’s Department of Music to Present Percussion, Guitar and String Ensembles Concert PDF Print E-mail
Written by FSU News and Media Services   
Saturday, 28 October 2017 07:54

Frostburg State University’s Department of Music will present the Percussion, Guitar and String Ensembles Concert on Wednesday, Nov. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pealer Recital Hall of FSU’s Woodward D. Pealer Performing Arts Center. This event is free and open to the public.

The Percussion Ensemble, under the direction of Gary Phillips, will first perform “Fanfare for Percussion Quartet” by Jeffrey D. Grubbs. The themes in this piece were inspired by percussively driven action-adventure films of the past, including the 1984 film, “The Terminator.” The ensemble will also perform “First Voyage of Auki Badorkins” by contemporary percussionist Michael LaRosa; “Aria of the Soul” (or “The Poem for Everyone's Soul”), a staple of the “Persona” video game series, arranged by student Nathan Kopit; and “Batik” by James Campbell, in which the use of pentatonic scales, as well as the rhythmic and melodic content, is an indication of the influences of Javanese gamelan music.

The FSU Guitar Ensemble, directed by Patrick Sise, will feature music from movies and TV. Come out to enjoy some tunes you might be surprised to hear.

The FSU String Ensemble, under the direction of Dr. Karen Lau, will present “The Allegretto Moderato in D Major, for String Trio (TH 152),” which was written in 1863 or 1864 as an exercise while Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was a student in composition classes at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory. “Intermezzo” from “Little Suite for Strings, Op.1” by Danish composer Carl Nielsen, is full of good humor. It commences with a lilting waltz and then is followed by a more energetic dance section that has a vague Viennese quality to it. “Romanian Folk Dances” by Hungarian composer Béla Bartók (arranged by Arthur Willner) is a suite of six short pieces composed in 1915. Bartók later orchestrated it for a small ensemble in 1917. Last on the list is “Waltz” from “Coppelia” by the French composer Leo Delibes (arranged by Jeff Manookian). The familiar waltz from this sentimental comic ballet remains a favorite on concert stages around the world.

For more information, contact FSU’s Department of Music at 301-687-4109.

FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

 
The Allegany Arts Council to Exhibit Work of Two Artists PDF Print E-mail
Written by Desiree Bullard   
Saturday, 28 October 2017 07:46

Marlaina Pacifico 1The Allegany Arts Council welcomes two regional artists, Parris Ashley and Marlaina Pacifico, to exhibit their artwork in the Saville and Schwab Mountain Maryland Galleries during the month of November. The exhibitions begin November 3 and end November 25.  

Marlaina Pacifico was born and raised in Altoona, Pa. She discovered her love of and talent for photography while in her early twenties. She has been a professional photographer for eight years and does commercial as well as artistic photography. Pacifico is the owner of The Grin Gallery, a studio and art gallery located at 230 Fourth Avenue in Altoona. She is also a teacher, having offered two photography classes at the Allegany Arts Council.

Parris Ashley was born in Baltimore, but spent his formative years in Detroit, Mich. Today, he lives in Frostburg. In 2016, he graduated from Frostburg State University with a BA in Painting and a minor in Art History. Ashley has completed over twenty murals in Allegany County since 2012. His murals can be found at locations such as Canal Place in Cumberland and the Public Pool in Frostburg. Ashley’s exhibition is a reflection of his sentiment toward current socioeconomic circumstances in America. The forty works are acrylic paintings on various surfaces, both conventional and recycled.

Parris Ashley 6

An opening reception for the exhibitions will be held at the Allegany Arts Council on Saturday, November 4, from 6 - 8pm. Refreshments will be available, and the public is welcome to attend. The Allegany Arts Council is located at 9 N. Centre St. in Cumberland. The galleries are open to the public Tuesday through Sunday between the hours of 11am and 5pm. For more information, please call (301) 777-2787 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 
MCTA Hosts Barrule in Final Concert of Celtic Music Series PDF Print E-mail
Written by FSU News and Media Services   
Thursday, 12 October 2017 07:22

BarruleFrostburg State University’s Mountain City Traditional Arts will round out its Celtic Music Series this fall with Barrule on Thursday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m. at 25 E. Main St. in Frostburg. The live entertainment is free and open to the public with a suggested donation of $15.

Named after the famous Manx summit where legend says the ancient Celtic God Manannan Maclir stalked his mighty fortress, Barrule is an award-winning trio hell-bent on taking the Isle of Man’s music to a much wider audience. The versatile acoustic unit consists of gifted fiddle-player Tomas Callister, accordion wizard Jamie Smith and versatile accompanist Adam Rhodes on bouzouki, who together create a powerful and wholly distinctive sound.

For more information, email MCTA at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or call 301-687-8040.

Dedicated to the education, sales, documentation and perpetuation of the traditional arts in the mountain region, MCTA is a program of FSU, supported in part by the Maryland Traditions Program of the Maryland State Arts Council.

FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

 
FSU’s Department of Music to Present Opera Theatre Performance, “A Night of Love, Magic and Death, W PDF Print E-mail
Written by FSU News and Media Services   
Saturday, 28 October 2017 07:59

Opera Theatre 2017Frostburg State University’s Opera Theatre will present “A Night of Love, Magic and Death, With Music From Purcell to Puccini” on Tuesday, Nov. 14, and Monday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pealer Recital Hall of FSU’s Woodward D. Pealer Performing Arts Center. This event is free and open to the public.

Directed by Dr. Tory Browers, this gala concert will feature operatic scenes from “La Bohème,” “Roméo et Juliette,” “The Magic Flute” and “Dido and Aeneas.”

Caption info: Opera Theatre students rehearse a “toast” from one of their scenes. They are, from left, Pateley Bonjiorni, David Cook, Gabriel Harper, accompanist Joseph Yungen, Hannah Miller, Raymond Sorenson, Jenna Blosser and Marsé Romero.

“La Bohème” was composed by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on the novel “Scènes de la vie de bohème” by Henri Murger, a collection of vignettes portraying young bohemians living in the Latin Quarter of Paris in the 1840s. The libretto focuses on the relationship between Rodolfo and Mimì, ending with her death. “La bohème” has become part of the standard Italian opera repertory, and it is one of the most frequently performed operas worldwide.

“Roméo et Juliette” is an opera by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on “The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare. The libretto follows the story of Shakespeare's play. The opera was first performed in Paris in 1867. It is notable for the series of four duets for the main characters and the waltz song “Je veux vivre” for the soprano.

“The Magic Flute” is by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. The work is in the form of a Singspiel, a popular form that included singing and spoken dialogue. The work premiered in 1791 in Vienna, just two months before the composer's premature death. In this opera, the Queen of the Night persuades Prince Tamino to rescue her daughter Pamina from captivity under the high priest Sarastro; instead, he learns the high ideals of Sarastro’s community and seeks to join it. Separately, then together, Tamino and Pamina undergo severe trials of initiation, which end in triumph, with the Queen and her cohorts vanquished.

“Dido and Aeneas” was written by the English Baroque composer Henry Purcell with a libretto by Nahum Tate, composed no later than 1688. The story is based on Book IV of Virgil’s “Aeneid.” It recounts the love of Dido, Queen of Carthage, for the Trojan hero Aeneas, and her despair when he abandons her. A monumental work in Baroque opera, “Dido and Aeneas” is remembered as one of Purcell’s foremost theatrical works. One of the earliest known English operas, it was also Purcell’s only true opera, as well as his only all-sung dramatic work.

Opera students include sopranos Jenna Blosser, Hannah Miller and Marsé Romero; mezzo-soprano Pateley Bongiorni; tenors David Cook and Gabriel Harper; and baritone Raymond Sorenson. Joseph Yungen will accompany the group on the piano.

For more information, contact FSU’s Department of Music at 301-687-4109.

FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

 
Lead Poisoning in Md.Drops to Lowest Recorded Levels PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jay Apperson   
Saturday, 28 October 2017 07:49

Governor Larry Hogan proclaims Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in Maryland

BALTIMORE (Oct. 25, 2017) – Childhood lead poisoning cases in Maryland decreased last year to the lowest levels since data has been collected in connection with the state’s 1994 lead law, according to a 2016 Childhood Blood Lead Surveillance report released today by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). Additionally, blood lead testing rates increased across Maryland in the first year of the state’s initiative to test all children at ages 1 and 2. MDE continues to work with the Department of Health (Health) and the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), as well as local partners, to prevent childhood lead poisoning in Maryland.

For the first time, the report also tracks potential sources of lead exposure in reported cases of childhood lead poisoning and finds that many young children with elevated blood lead levels may have been exposed to lead from sources other than deteriorated lead-based paint.

The report follows Governor Larry Hogan’s announcement earlier this year that the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved an application by the Maryland Department of Health to launch a $7.2 million initiative to reduce lead poisoning and improve asthma, two conditions related to environmental conditions in housing. The Department of Health, in collaboration with the MDE and the DHCD, will implement the initiative. Governor Hogan also proclaimed this week as Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in Maryland.

Blood lead testing rates and a new initiative

Blood lead testing rates increased across the state in 2016. Maryland’s new initiative to test all children at ages 1 and 2, regardless of where they live, was announced by the Hogan administration in October 2015 in response to data showing that the state could improve its testing and identification of children with lead exposure.

Although the new Department of Health regulations for increased testing were in effect for only nine months in 2016, starting in March of that year, the 2016 Childhood Blood Lead Surveillance report shows that the number of children age 1 or 2 tested for blood lead in Maryland was 12.2 percent higher than the comparable average for the prior six years. Most counties experienced increases in testing rates, with the largest increases in Howard, Frederick and Carroll counties, each of which saw rates in 2016 increase by more than half. Harford, Queen Anne’s, and Calvert counties also saw increases from 25 to 50 percent.

The report attributes the increase in testing of young children to the universal blood lead testing initiative for 1- and 2-year-olds and to another Maryland Department of Health initiative to endorse Point of Care testing for lead, which allows healthcare providers to test children and provide results in the same office visit. This simplifies testing for parents and, in most cases, eliminates any further office visits or testing for lead.

Childhood lead poisoning cases and Maryland’s lead law

Even with the increase in blood lead testing, the report shows that the percentage of tested young children in Maryland with blood levels at or above the level that triggers action under state law decreased compared to the prior year. This is the lowest level since the beginning of such data collection in 1993.

Last year, less than 0.3 percent of Maryland children tested had an elevated blood lead level that equaled or exceeded the state law-defined elevated level of 10 micrograms per deciliter. The comparable figure for Baltimore City also decreased to the lowest levels since the beginning of data collection, to 1 percent.

The report’s findings represent a decrease since 1993 of more than 98 percent in the number of young children reported to have lead poisoning. Much of the decline in blood lead levels is the result of implementation and enforcement of Maryland’s 1994 Reduction of Lead Risk in Housing Act.

The report also shows a decline in the percentage of tested children with blood lead levels below the state-law-defined elevated level, but still of concern based on guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of Maryland children identified with blood lead levels of 5-9 micrograms per deciliter decreased from 1,789 in 2015 to 1,729 in 2016. MDE and the Baltimore City Health Department coordinate to investigate pre-1978 rental units in the city where children with test results of 5-9 micrograms per deciliter live.

MDE serves as the coordinating agency for statewide efforts to eliminate childhood lead poisoning. In addition to the new lead testing plan, under the Hogan administration, Maryland has moved to protect more children from the health risks associated with lead paint poisoning by enforcing an expansion of the type of rental housing covered by the state’s lead law.

Tracking potential sources

In 2016, MDE began comprehensively tracking potential sources of childhood lead exposure. While exposure to lead paint hazards continues to affect children across Maryland, exposure from other sources has been observed, the report states.

For example, 20 of 35 confirmed cases in Prince George’s County were children of refugee families who had relocated to the United States and recently settled in that county, the report finds. Also, cosmetics, such as kohl, and spices purchased outside the United States were identified as potential health hazards during investigations of a significant number of cases across Maryland.

DHCD’s Lead Hazard Reduction Program

The Special Loans Program of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development continues to make a significant impact on the lead exposure from lead-based paint in pre-1978 housing stock statewide. The Lead Hazard Reduction Loan and Grant Program was established by the Maryland General Assembly in 1986 solely for the purpose to extend loans and grants to eligible individuals, child care centers, and sponsors to finance the lead hazard reduction of residential housing units. In Fiscal Year 2017, the program helped abate lead in 114 homes for $1,776,139. In addition, the department’s energy programs utilized abatement-related activities on 37 homes for $75,000.

Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids Lead Initiative gets approval

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved an application by the Maryland Department of Health to launch a $4.17 million initiative to reduce lead poison conditions through the abatement of lead and other lead-related repairs in housing.

The initiative leverages federal funds available through the Maryland Children’s Health Program under the authority of a Health Services Initiative State Plan Amendment. The Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids Program will receive $4.17 million in funding, using a combination of $3.67 million in CHIP federal matching funds and $500,000 in State fiscal year 2018 funds. Eligibility requirements for the initiative are as follows: a child who has a lead test result of 5 mg/dl; 18 years or younger, lives in or visits in the home or apartment for 10 hours or more a week; and are currently eligible or enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP.

DHCD will administer the initiative through a network of nonprofits, local agencies, and contractors to help complete the projects. The local health boards and primary care physicians will assist in referring the impacted families to the program to get the much-needed repairs completed.

More information

Childhood lead poisoning is a completely preventable disease.

Exposure to lead is the most significant and widespread environmental hazard for children in Maryland. Children are at the greatest risk from birth to age 6 while their neurological systems are developing. Exposure to lead can cause long-term neurological damage that may be associated with learning and behavioral problems and with decreased intelligence.

Maryland’s lead law requires owners of pre-1978 rental dwelling units to register their properties and reduce the potential for children’s exposure to lead paint hazards by performing specific lead risk reduction treatments prior to each change in tenancy.

Under the Maryland lead law, the Department of the Environment: assures compliance with mandatory requirements for lead risk reduction in rental units built before 1978; maintains a statewide listing of registered and inspected units; and provides blood lead surveillance through a registry of test results of all children tested in Maryland. The lead program also: oversees case management follow-up by local health departments for children with elevated blood lead levels; certifies and enforces performance standards for inspectors and contractors conducting lead hazard reduction; and performs environmental investigations of lead poisoned children. The lead program provides oversight for community education to parents, tenants, rental property owners, home owners and health care providers to enhance their roles in lead poisoning prevention. Maryland works in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Baltimore City and other local governments and non-profit organizations such as the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative to prevent childhood lead poisoning.

Quotes

“We are making progress in the battle against childhood lead poisoning in Maryland. The Maryland Department of the Environment is committed to reducing exposure to lead in newer rental homes now covered under Maryland’s lead law and to enforcing the law for older rental units, including those in Baltimore City. We will work closely with our partners, such as the Department of Health, the Department of Housing and Community Development, Baltimore City, the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative, and the U.S. EPA to eliminate this completely preventable disease.”

-  Ben Grumbles, Secretary, Maryland Department of the Environment

 “We are extremely pleased with the progress that the State’s health care providers, parents, and advocates have made over the last year in testing more children for lead, in conjunction with the Department of Health and the Department of Environment.  Together with the State’s recently announced efforts to increase resources for lead abatement and environmental case management through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, the increased testing helps to fulfill the State’s commitment to reduce and eliminate childhood lead poisoning in Maryland.”

-  Jinlene Chan, Acting Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services, Maryland Department of Health

“The Department of Housing and Community Development is proud to partner with the Department of the Environment and the Department of Health to support lead paint abatement in our state’s communities. Programs like the Lead Hazard Reduction Loan and Grant Program have been instrumental in the reduction of childhood lead poisoning cases and new initiatives like Healthy Homes for Healthy Kids will enable us to continue our positive progress to protect Maryland’s children from exposure to lead.”

-  Matt Heckles, Assistant Secretary, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development

 
FSU to Present Writer Victoria Law, Author of “Resistance Behind Bars” PDF Print E-mail
Written by FSU News and Media Services   
Saturday, 28 October 2017 07:34

Frostburg State University will host freelance writer and editor Victoria Law in a presentation on her book, “Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women” on Monday, Nov. 6, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Lane University Center’s Atkinson Room (232). The presentation is free and open to the public.

Law’s book won the 2009 Prevention for a Safer Society (PASS) award. Law frequently writes and speaks about the intersections among mass incarceration, gender and resistance. For more information about the author, visit https://victorialaw.net.

This event is funded by the FSU African American Studies program, the Faculty Development and Sabbatical Subcommittee Workshop/Speaker Grant program and the FSU Foundation Opportunity Grant program.

For more information about the event, contact Dr. Amy Branam Armiento at  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

FSU is committed to making all of its programs, services and activities accessible to persons with disabilities. To request accommodations through the ADA Compliance Office, call 301-687-4102 or use a Voice Relay Operator at 1-800-735-2258.

 
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